Katie Price is in therapy to cope with mother's illness

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    Katie Price revealed she has sought the help of a therapist in a bid to cope with her mother’s battle with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) during Thursday’s Loose Women. 

    The 39-year-old star burst into tears live on the ITV show when discussing her mum Amy’s health last month, but, returning for the first time since her breakdown, she admitted a lot has changed since seeking professional medical help.

    The TV personality has also been forced to deal with the infidelity of her husband Kieran Hayler, who she discovered had been unfaithful for a third time just days after her mother’s diagnosis. 

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    'I don't want to be a burden': Katie Price revealed she has sought the help of a therapist in a bid to cope with her mother's battle with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    ‘I don’t want to be a burden’: Katie Price revealed she has sought the help of a therapist in a bid to cope with her mother’s battle with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    Pouring her heart out on the ITV show, Katie confessed: ‘For ages lots of things were building up and my mum’s thing was the top of it and me being me I just don’t want to be a burden on anyone.

     ”But I watched myself back and I thought, ‘Oh my god, I think I better go and see a doctor to talk about this.’ 

    ‘So I did go and see the doctor even though I was a bit worried in case they told me that something was wrong with me.’

    Keeping positive: Returning to the show for the first time since her breakdown on Thursday, she admitted a lot has changed since seeking professional medical health

    Keeping positive: Returning to the show for the first time since her breakdown on Thursday, she admitted a lot has changed since seeking professional medical health

    Keeping positive: Returning to the show for the first time since her breakdown on Thursday, she admitted a lot has changed since seeking professional medical health

    Break down: The 39-year-old star burst into tears live on Loose Women when discussing her mum Amy's health last month

    Break down: The 39-year-old star burst into tears live on Loose Women when discussing her mum Amy's health last month

    Break down: The 39-year-old star burst into tears live on Loose Women when discussing her mum Amy's health last month

    Break down: The 39-year-old star burst into tears live on Loose Women when discussing her mum Amy's health last month

    Break down: The 39-year-old star burst into tears live on Loose Women when discussing her mum Amy’s health last month

    Helping hand: Katie will continue to see a therapist to help her come to terms with the fact that her beloved mother Amy is going to die after being diagnosed with IPF

    Helping hand: Katie will continue to see a therapist to help her come to terms with the fact that her beloved mother Amy is going to die after being diagnosed with IPF

    Helping hand: Katie will continue to see a therapist to help her come to terms with the fact that her beloved mother Amy is going to die after being diagnosed with IPF

    Poorly: Amy's terminal illness causes a build up of scar tissue on the lungs that causes the organs to stiffen make it difficult for the sufferer to inhale oxygen

    Poorly: Amy's terminal illness causes a build up of scar tissue on the lungs that causes the organs to stiffen make it difficult for the sufferer to inhale oxygen

    Poorly: Amy’s terminal illness causes a build up of scar tissue on the lungs that causes the organs to stiffen make it difficult for the sufferer to inhale oxygen

    She continued: ‘But they told me that everything had just built up because I have so much going on and it was the best thing I ever did.’ 

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis 

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a condition in which the lungs become scarred and breathing becomes increasingly difficult.

    IPF has a prognosis worse than many cancers and most sufferers go on to develop respiratory failure and die of suffocation as their lung capacity reduces. 

    The disease – which kills 5,300 people every year – creates a build-up of scar tissue in the lung which makes them thick and less able to take in oxygen.

    Regardless of treatment, people with IPF, which usually strikes those in their late 40s or early 50s – on average only live for around three to five years from diagnosis.

    Although still considered a rare disease, IPF has become more common in both the UK and the US over the last 30 years.

    The symptoms of IPF tend to develop gradually and get slowly worse over time.

    • Symptoms can include:
    • shortness of breath
    • a persistent dry cough
    • tiredness
    • loss of appetite and weight loss
    • rounded and swollen fingertips (clubbed fingers)

    There is no cure and it’s very difficult to predict how long someone with IPF will survive at the time of diagnosis.

    Regular monitoring over time can indicate whether it’s getting worse quickly or slowly.

    Source: NHS Choices

    ‘I sat there for two hours and got everything off my chest that’s been going on with Kieran and my mum, the court case everything that I had and it was so nice it just feels as though a weight has been lifted from, my shoulders.’ 

    Her fellow panellist Jane Moore then said: “So it was like a therapist.”

    Prompting Katie to explain, the mother-of-five elaborated: ‘I was embarrassed, I thought, “I don’t need to go to a doctor.” 

    ‘But it was so good, I didn’t know how I was going to cope with my mum’s illness. But I thought, “You know what Kate, just go”.’

    Katie will continue to see a therapist to help her come to terms with the fact that her beloved mother Amy is going to die.

    Amy was diagnosed with IPF, which causes a build up of scar tissue on the lungs that causes the organs to stiffen make it difficult for the sufferer to inhale oxygen.

    She added: ‘It was the best thing I did, what the is going to do is that I’m going to learn to cope with my mum’s [death] before she goes. I’m going to go until my mum goes to keep me strong.’ 

    And Katie’s doctor has also recommended that she makes more time for herself and not spend all her hours working or caring for her family, which includes kids Harvey, 15, Junior, 12, Princess, 10, Jett, four, and Bunny, three. 

    Glam: Katie was typically glamorous for her turn on today's show, clad in an embellished jumper and metallic headband

    Glam: Katie was typically glamorous for her turn on today's show, clad in an embellished jumper and metallic headband

    Glam: Katie was typically glamorous for her turn on today's show, clad in an embellished jumper and metallic headband

    Glam: Katie was typically glamorous for her turn on today's show, clad in an embellished jumper and metallic headband

    Glam: Katie was typically glamorous for her turn on today’s show, clad in an embellished jumper and metallic headband

    Onwards and upwards: Katie was back at her best as she chatted to guest panelist Emma Willis 

    Onwards and upwards: Katie was back at her best as she chatted to guest panelist Emma Willis 

    Onwards and upwards: Katie was back at her best as she chatted to guest panelist Emma Willis 

    Line-up: Katie was joined on the show by [From left] Andrea McLean, Nadia Sawalha and Jane Moore

    Line-up: Katie was joined on the show by [From left] Andrea McLean, Nadia Sawalha and Jane Moore

    Line-up: Katie was joined on the show by [From left] Andrea McLean, Nadia Sawalha and Jane Moore

    Sound advice: Katie's doctor has also recommended that she makes more time for herself and not spend all her hours working or caring for her family

    Sound advice: Katie's doctor has also recommended that she makes more time for herself and not spend all her hours working or caring for her family

    Sound advice: Katie’s doctor has also recommended that she makes more time for herself and not spend all her hours working or caring for her family

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