Fitness coach shares before and after photos to make an important point about ‘transformations’

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    Fitness blogger's before and after photos makes an important point about 'transformations'
    (Picture: Instagram/annavictoria)

    Anna Victoria is super fit and glamorous. She’s got more than a million followers on Instagram, is a mega successful fitness coach, and always looks incredible.

    But she also wants people to know that her flawless Instagram photos aren’t necessarily reflective of reality.

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    She’s previously demonstrated the difference lighting can make to flattering your body, showed off her stomach rolls, and broken down the power of angles.

    This time around, she’s taking down the concept of the ‘transformation photos’ you keep seeing all over your Instagram.

    Anna Victoria shared two photos side by side – one of her from 2012, and one from 2017.

    But she doesn’t want to call her journey a ‘transformation’, or focus on how different she looks. Instead, Anna Victoria wants us to reflect on the changes we make on the inside, too.

    My “transformation” 💗 Sometimes I don’t like calling it that because I was never unhappy with the way I looked to begin with. • My transformation was more about how I felt on the inside, about my health, and that’s not something I can show you in a picture. Nevertheless, instagram is a visual platform and we are visual creatures so here we are. While I’m happy with the physical changes I’ve worked so hard for, they don’t compare to the non-physical changes that aren’t visible to the naked eye. Those non-physical changes are what keep me going. There’s always room for physical improvement and there’s always someone who looks better than you, and those two facts can be freaking exhausting if it’s all you’re concerned with. It can put you in a constant state of wanting to restrict food more, work out more, and if you’re not careful, lead to an unhealthy obsession and relationship with workouts and with food. That’s not what I want for me or for any one of you. • The before photo was in November 2012, so nearly 5 years ago. Could someone see progress in less time? Of course, and I did see significant progress not long after this ‘before’ photo. My transformation didn’t take 5 years, it took about 9 months. I do set goals and push myself, but I’ve always been overly conscious of maintaining balance and never letting fitness take over my life. These last 5 years I’ve been pushing myself but I’ve also been living my life, enjoying vacations and cheat meals and completely indulging and having no regrets. I don’t work out to punish myself for eating ice cream and I don’t restrict myself if I feel I want to relax a bit. I DO however keep in mind how food affects me mentally and emotionally and that’s what keeps me eating as healthy as I do. • Do I have people telling me I should be more lean? Yes. That I could gain more muscle? Yes. But I’m not concerned with other people’s ideas of what I should or shouldn’t do with my body. I’m doing what I want which is to kick ass in the gym, be empowered by my workouts and feeling strong, but still enjoy life and to value balance above rock hard abs or a lower body fat percentage. #fbggirls www.annavictoria.com/guides

    A post shared by Anna Victoria (@annavictoria) on

    ‘I don’t like calling it that because I was never unhappy with the way I looked to begin with,’ she wrote.

    ‘My transformation was more about how I felt on the inside, about my health, and that’s not something I can show you in a picture.

    ‘While I’m happy with the physical changes I’ve worked so hard for, they don’t compare to the non-physical changes that aren’t visible to the naked eye.

    ‘Those non-physical changes are what keep me going.’

    Anna wants to remind us that focusing only on the appearance side of things will only make us feel like we’re not good enough, making us forget about all the other important parts of getting healthy for yourself.

    ‘There’s always room for physical improvement and there’s always someone who looks better than you, and those two facts can be freaking exhausting if it’s all you’re concerned with,’ she wrote.

    ‘It can put you in a constant state of wanting to restrict food more, work out more, and if you’re not careful, lead to an unhealthy obsession and relationship with workouts and with food.

    ‘That’s not what I want for me or for any one of you.’

    For her, making sure comparison doesn’t come into things is down to maintaining a balance and never letting fitness stop her from doing things that make her feel good.

    ‘These last 5 years I’ve been pushing myself but I’ve also been living my life, enjoying vacations and cheat meals and completely indulging and having no regrets,’ Anna Victoria explains.

    ‘I don’t work out to punish myself for eating ice cream and I don’t restrict myself if I feel I want to relax a bit.

    ‘I DO however keep in mind how food affects me mentally and emotionally and that’s what keeps me eating as healthy as I do.

    ‘Do I have people telling me I should be more lean? Yes. That I could gain more muscle? Yes.

    ‘But I’m not concerned with other people’s ideas of what I should or shouldn’t do with my body.

    ‘I’m doing what I want which is to kick ass in the gym, be empowered by my workouts and feeling strong, but still enjoy life and to value balance above rock hard abs or a lower body fat percentage.’

    Well done to Anna Victoria for reminding us once again that how we look in photos isn’t the most important thing, and it’s definitely not something to be worried about.

    Fitness and being healthy is about more than just our looks. It’s about how we feel, how we take care of ourselves, and learning to love our bodies.

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